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Kenneth Mark Simeus WANTED $1000 REWARD

Kenneth Mark Simeus WANTED $1000 REWARD

Kenneth Mark Simeus aka “KK”

WANTED – $1000 REWARD

Kenneth is wanted out of Las Vegas, Nevada for felony warrants. He is 6’1 tall and weighs 220lbs and of very dark complexion. DOB 08-02-1979. Kenneth Simeus has a scorpion tattoo on his forehead and cheek as well as his entire throat and neck as well as body.

Kenneth Mark Simeus drives a 2009 black Mercedes S550, 4 door sedan, dark tinted windows, red interior and most likely Nevada plates.

$1000 REWARD

Call / Text 702-580-3911 CONFIDENTIAL

Kenneth Mark Simeus - WANTED - $1000 REWARD

Kenneth Mark Simeus – WANTED – $1000 REWARD

Kenneth Mark Simeus - WANTED - $1000 REWARD

Kenneth Mark Simeus – WANTED – $1000 REWARD

Bail Bonds in Las Vegas Nevada

If your friend or loved one was arrested recently call Marc at eBAIL and he can make arrangements for their release. Call Now! Easy Payments!

702-462-9200

 

Bail Bonds Las Vegas

Bail Bonds in Las Vegas Nevada

If your friend or loved one went to jail recently call Marc at eBAIL and he can make arrangements for their release. Call Now! Easy Payments!

702-462-9200

 

Bail Bonds Las Vegas

U.S. Constitutional Right to Bail

U.S. Constitutional Right to Bail

The constitutional right to bail offered by the Eighth Amendment in the U.S. is for the protection against excessively high amounts set by the courts. This does not mean that you always have a constitutional right to be given a chance at bonding out of jail if you pose a substantial risk or if you are facing very serious charges. It simply means that the judge cannot put your bail amount higher than what is reasonable to ensure your return to face your charges.

Eighth Amendment and the Bill of Rights

The Bill of Rights consists of the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution. Number eight of these amendments refers to the rights of defendants against the following:

  • Excessive bail
  • Excessive fines
  • Cruel and unusual punishment

While these provisions were originally intended for the federal government, the Supreme Court has determined that state governments may not implement cruel and unusual punishment either. These provisions were put in place to prevent excessive hardship to those who are accused of committing crimes.

English Influence for the Eighth Amendment

The three protections offered by this constitutional amendment are not unique to the U.S. but are practically copied from a Bill of Rights provided in England in 1689, over one hundred years earlier. The English Amendment was meant to prevent arbitrary punishments from being handed out to defendants by judges and focused on the use of precedent in order to help the punishment fit the crime. Proponents for the amendment to the U.S. Constitution wanted these restrictions to be applied to Congress as well in order to reduce the potential for abuse of power.

U.S. Supreme Court Ruling 1951

In the Supreme Court case of Stack v. Boyle, twelve defendants from the Communist party were held under extremely high amounts of bail. Exercising their constitutional rights, they filed to the Supreme Court to hear their case. The Court determined that the amount was indeed set much higher than necessary, and that the amount should not be set at “a figure higher than is reasonably calculated” to make sure that the defendant shows up for trial. The Supreme Court did make note that there might be times that a judge may set an exceptionally high amount of bail if it can be shown that there is justification in that specific case.

U.S. Constitutional Right to Bail

This right to bail is more of a right against an excessive amount being applied. In fact, the Bail Reform Act was passed in 1966 to further allow for reduced financial strain on defendants of crimes. While this helped to alleviate some of the financial burden before trial, there was no differentiation between low-risk and high-risk inmates. The Bail Reform Act of 1984 made these matters more clear, allowing the court to detain or release an accused individual based on the “perceived evil” that person posed to the community.

How expensive is a Nevada Bail Bond?

The state of Nevada has set the cost of a bond at 15% of the amount that is set by the judge. This means that you would pay a bail bondsman in Las Vegas 15% of your set bail. If the judge determines that you would have to pay $10,000 to get out of jail, you can pay a qualified bail bondsman just 15% of that amount, or $1,500. This may not be cheap, but it sure is less expensive than paying the full amount all at once.

Best Bail Bond Service in Las Vegas

If you could use the help of a trustworthy bondsman in Las Vegas, turn to Marc Gabriel and eBAIL. We take payments over the phone, online, or in person. After we receive the money, we will go and pay the full amount to the jail to secure the release of your loved one. If you cannot afford to pay the 15%, we can work with you to establish a payment plan.

If you are arrested while you are in Las Vegas and cannot afford to pay the cash bond, you can hire a bail bondsman to put up a surety bond on your behalf. The specific type of bond that you need can depend on the crime for which you are facing charges.

Detainees Arraignment Decision made by the Judge:

After arrest, you will go before a judge. The court will decide on your bail amount, if any is required. You may be released on your own recognizance. This means that you will not have to pay any bail to be released and is more likely to happen if you are facing misdemeanor charges. The court may set a bail amount. This typically occurs for many felony charges. There is a risk that you may be detained without any type of bail being set. This more often happens if you are being charged with murder or if you are considered to be a flight risk.

Detainee has two Bond Options

When the court sets a bail amount, you have two choices to bond out of jail. If you can pay the full amount to the court, this is called a cash bond. If you do not have enough money to pay the bail, you can secure a surety bond through a bail bondsman. For a surety bond, you will pay a portion of the bail amount to the bondsman who will then pay the bail on your behalf.

Common Types of Bail Bonds (Surety Bonds)

You may need to obtain a bond for certain misdemeanor or felony offenses. Common bonds include those for:

  • Controlled substance
  • Domestic violence
  • DUI – driving under the influence
  • Immigration problems
  • Traffic violation
  • Warrant issues
  • Weapons charges

You may also be able to obtain a bond for little or no money down. However, you will need to place some type of property up for collateral that is agreed upon between you and the bail bondsman.

How does a Bail Bond in Las Vegas work?

If you would like to secure a bond, you will want to find a qualified bail bondsman. You will be required to pay a fee that is equal to 15% of the bail amount. The bail bondsman will then go to the jail and pay the bail so that the release process for the detainee can begin.

How expensive is a Bail Bond?

As required by law, a bondsman will accept 15% of the amount for bail that the court or judge set in the case. This may or may not be considered as expensive, depending on how high the bail is set. For example, if the judge set bail at $5,000, the amount you would pay the bondsman would be $750. While this may seem like a lot of money to come up with all at once, it is certainly much less than the original $5,000.

Best Las Vegas Bail Bond Service

If you are looking for a knowledgeable and reliable bondsman in Las Vegas, turn to Marc Gabriel and eBAIL. We are renowned in the region and come highly recommended by top attorneys in this area. As the only bail bond service that is accredited with the Better Business Bureau, you can have confidence that we will get the job done promptly and accurately. We accept payments in person, by phone, and online. We will even work with you to come up with payment arrangements that better fit your budget.

If you have a warrant out for your arrest, you might wonder if there is a way for a bail bondsman to help you to avoid being booked into jail to await trial. There are certain instances where a bondsman can help to prevent you from being arrested. However, it is important to note that this is not always the case.

Your Options to Address an Arrest Warrant

You may worry that you are stuck and just have to play a waiting game until you are finally caught by law enforcement, but you can take proactive action in these matters. You can turn yourself in to the jail. While there, you may be arrested and booked to wait for a bail hearing. If there is a bail amount that is set on the warrant, you can pay the full amount of the bail, often called a cash bond, when you turn yourself in to avoid arrest and detainment. Your other option is to hire a bail bondsman to secure a bail bond, often referred to as a surety bond.

How a Bail Bond Works in lieu of Bail

In order to secure a surety bond, you will pay a qualified bondsman a fee that is 15% of the amount of bail. Either the accused or the co-signor for the bond will have to put up enough collateral to cover the full amount of bail. Once the agreement has been made, the bondsman will pay the entire amount of bail that was set on your behalf. If you can secure the bond prior to turning yourself in, you may avoid arrest. If you are waiting in jail, the release process can begin once the bondsman posts bail.

Why hire a bail bondsman if you have a warrant?

Quite possibly the biggest reason to hire the services of a bondsman is to avoid spending time in jail. This way, you will not have to miss work or let the matter potentially affect your employment. You can be home with your family to better manage your obligations and to make arrangements to deal with your legal matters. A major advantage of hiring a bondsman rather than paying the full amount of a cash bond yourself is that you only have to pay 15% right away. This leaves the rest of your finances available to hire an attorney and to otherwise prepare your legal defense strategy.

Best Bail Bond Service to Choose in Las Vegas

When you come to Las Vegas, you are generally planning for some fun and do not anticipate spending time in jail. Make sure that you get the assistance you need from a knowledgeable bondsman with Marc Gabriel from eBAIL. We have gained the trust of many top attorneys, who refer their clients to us on a regular basis. Fully insured and BBB accredited, we take your freedom and your confidentiality seriously. We will work quickly to make sure that bail for you or your loved one is paid promptly to begin the release process. If you do not have the full 15% of the bail amount right away, we can work with you. With little to no money down, we can set you up with weekly or monthly payment arrangements in order to get the bond settled without delay.

When you need to help a friend or a loved on to secure a release from jail, it can be helpful to know the difference between a cash bond and a surety bond. While both of these types of bonds can be used to get a defendant released from a detention center to await scheduled court hearings, there is a bit of a difference regarding the use of each.

Detainee’s options after Judge sets the cash bail amount

When a person accused of a crime is arrested and taken to a detention center in Las Vegas, there will be a hearing in order to determine the amount of bail to be paid to secure the temporary release of the defendant. If you pay the full amount of bail, this is referred to as a cash bond. The defendant may also try to get the bail amount reduced by hiring an attorney, but this takes time. You may obtain a bail bond, or surety bond for 15% of the amount of bail that is set by the judge or the court.

How does a Cash Bond work?

The detainee can have a friend, family member, or other representative pay the full amount of the bail to the court. While this is a large amount of money to be paid upfront, the money will be returned, less any fines and fees, once the defendant attends to all legal proceedings.

How does a Surety Bond (Bail Bond) work?

If you do not have the full amount of bail, you can pay 15% of this amount to a bondsman. You will also have to provide enough collateral to secure the entire amount of bail as a surety that the defendant will appear at all court proceedings. The bail bondsman will go to the jail and pay the full amount for the detainee to be released.

Surety bonds and co-signor

If you make an agreement with a bondsman, you may be referred to as the co-signor of the bond. You will need to make sure that the accused shows up to all court dates and that the 15% fee is paid. When you sign over collateral, you are giving the bondsman power of attorney over that property.

Types of Collateral that can be used for the bail bond:

– Cash
– Credit card
– Bank account
– Land
– Home or other property
– Car or other motor vehicle title
– Fine jewelry
– Coins (gold or silver)
– Firearms
– Items of value that can be pawned or sold for cash

If the Accused shows up for court dates:

As long as the defendant attends to all legal matters, the collateral will be returned to you. The bondsman will keep the 15% fee for the provided service.

If the Accused skips their court dates:

If the defendant flees, the bail bondsman has 6 months in order to located and return the accused. In the event that the defendant cannot be located, the bondsman will pay the full amount of bail. The co-signor will owe the bondsman the 15% plus the full amount of bail or the collateral will be forfeited to the bondsman. As a co-signor, you can turn in the defendant to have that individual arrested if you are concerned about a flight risk before the court dates and cancel the bond.

Best Las Vegas Bail Bond Service

Make sure you work with a trustworthy and professional bondsman and choose Marc Gabriel here at eBAIL. We are fully insured and accredited with the Better Business Bureau.

When you wish to help a friend or loved one to get out of jail, you should be aware of the obligations of a bail bond co-signor before making an agreement. You have certain rights and responsibilities regarding your part in securing a bond for someone else as a co-signor.

Detainees bail is set by the judge

When someone is arrested in Las Vegas, that individual is taken to one of three detention centers in the area. There will be a hearing where the judge will determine a bail amount that must be paid in order for the accused to be released. The entire amount of the bail can be paid. An alternative course of action is to hire a lawyer to try to get the bail amount lowered. If a detainee does not want to spend a lot of time waiting in the detention center, a bail bondsman can be hired for 15% of the set bail amount.

How does a Bail Bond in work?

Your friend or loved one may ask you to contact a bondsman for assistance. You will be required to pay 15% of the bail amount that was set by the court as a fee for service. You may also be required to put up some form of bail bond collateral that is sufficient to cover the full amount of bail. The bail bondsman will then arrange for the full bail with the jail to begin the release process for the detainee.

Obligations of a Bail Bond co-signor

If you make a bail agreement with a bondsman, your responsibility as a co-signor has just begun. You will need to make sure that the accused appears for all scheduled court dates and that the 15% fee is paid in full to the bondsman. You give power of attorney to the bondsman and run the risk of losing whatever property you put up as bail bond collateral.

Types of Collateral that can be used for the bail bond

You can use cash, money from bank accounts, or a credit card as collateral on the bond. Other items that are good for bail bond collateral include your home or other property, land, vehicles, gold and silver coins, jewelry, firearms, or any item of value that can be pawned.

If the Accused shows up for court dates:

As long as the accused shows up for all legal proceedings, you will only owe the 15% to the bondsman. Anything you put up as collateral will be released.

If the Accused skips their court dates

If the defendant flees, the bail bondsman has 6 months to located and return the accused to the detention center, or the bondsman will owe the court the full bail amount. This means that as a co-signor, you will be responsible for the full bail amount or lose the property you put up for collateral. If you are concerned that the accused will not return to court, you can call the bondsman to cancel the bond, give the whereabouts of the defendant, and have that individual arrested and returned to jail. This will release from your obligation from the bond agreement.

Best Las Vegas Bail Bond Service

If you are looking for a professional and reliable bail bondsman in Las Vegas, turn to Marc Gabriel and eBail for excellent service. At eBAIL, we have a strong reputation with the courts and top-rated attorneys. We’ll help you with payment arrangements to secure the release of your loved one promptly.

When securing a bond for yourself or a loved one, it is important to be aware of the various types of bail bond collateral that you might be able to use. If the accused fails to appear for scheduled hearings and the trial after being released from jail on a bond, this collateral may be retained by the bondsman to be sold as repayment for the full amount of bail as a part of the bond agreement.

Detainees bail is set by the judge

If you or someone you know is arrested in Las Vegas, that individual will be taken to one of the three detention centers, booked, and given a bail hearing. The judge will determine the amount of bail. There are three choices at this point. The individual or a representative may:
– Pay the full amount of bail set by the judge
– Hire a bail bondsman for 15% of the set amount of bail
– Hire an attorney to try to have the bail amount reduced

How does a Bail Bond in Las Vegas work?

A detainee may have an opportunity to contact a bail bondsman or a friend or loved one for assistance. The bail bondsman will require 15% of the bail amount as a fee. The bondsman will then make arrangements for the full amount of bail to the detention center in order to begin the release process for the individual who was arrested.

Types of Collateral that can be used for the bail bond

You can hire a bail bondsman for 15% of the bail amount. While this amount is typically paid in cash, an individual may not have access to that much cash, either in a bank account or by using a high limit credit card, if the amount of bail is set very high. In that case, a bondsman will take certain items in lieu of cash to hold until the accused takes care of all legal matters or as payment for the 15% fee. Large items of property, such as a home, land, or car may be used. Smaller property items that can be pawned or are of great value, such as jewelry, gold or silver coins, or firearms may also be considered. Basically any item that has value can be used in place of cash to secure the release of the arrested party from a detention center.

Accused shows up for court dates

As long as the accused shows up for all hearings and trial dates, the only fee will be the 15% paid to the bondsman.

Accused skips their court dates

If the accused does not show for hearings or trial, the bondsman can use various means to find and secure the defendant, including the hiring of a fugitive retrieval service. The bondsman has 6 months, after which time the bondsman will lose the bail that was put up at the jail for the accused as a part of the bond agreement. In addition to the 15% fee, the defendant will now owe the full amount of the bail to the bondsman. In this case, the bondsman can collect any collateral that was used to secure the bond.

Best Las Vegas Bail Bond Service

When putting up property or cash to secure a bond, you want to deal with someone you can trust. That is where Marc Gabriel at eBAIL comes in. We are fully insured and accredited with the Better Business Bureau. We can help you with payment arrangements with little or no money down.

If you or a loved one is arrested in LV, Nevada, you can make a bail bond agreement with a qualified bondsman in order to secure your release before trial. You can agree to this bail contract so that you do not have to remain at the detention center until the date of your trial. There are some responsibilities that you should know about before you enter any type of contract.

Detainee’s bail is set by the judge

After being arrested and taken to jail, the accused will have a bail amount set by the courts based on the severity of the offense. A friend or family member can pay the full amount of bail that is set by the judge in order to secure the detainee’s release from the detention center. You can also find a bondsman in LV, Nevada. You are only required to pay 15% of the bail amount in order to begin the release process. Another option is to hire a lawyer to try to have the bail lowered, but this can take time where the defendant will remain behind bars while waiting for the new bail hearing.

How does a Bail Bond in Las Vegas work?

The law requires that a bondsman collect 15% of the bail amount as fee. In many cases, collateral may be required as well. Once this fee is paid, the bondsman will go to the jail and cover the full amount of the bail. This is when the release process can officially begin.

Accused shows up for court dates

The bail contract is required to ensure that the accused will show up for any subsequent court dates. As long as the defendant shows up at court when scheduled, there will be no additional fees owed to the bondsman other than the 15% already arranged. This 15% fee that is paid to the bail bondsman is not refundable.

Accused skips their court dates

If the defendant breaks the bail bond agreement by missing court dates, the accused may reschedule the date immediately in person or through an attorney or may risk further action. If no attempt is made by the accused to contact the court, the bail bondsman has 6 months to apprehend the defendant to transfer to the courts. The bondsman may choose to hire a Fugitive Recovery Service, more commonly known as a bounty hunter, in order to find and secure the accused. If the defendant cannot be located within the 6 months, the bondsman is required to pay the full amount of bail to the courts. The accused will then owe the full amount of bail in addition to the 15% already arranged as well as any additional fees imposed. The bondsman may also collect any collateral that was held as security for the bond.

Best Las Vegas Bail Bond Service

You do not have to take chances with your money and your freedom when you work with Marc Gabriel and eBAIL. At eBAIL, we take pride in providing professional service to each client. We maintain the respect of some of the top attorneys in the area, who regularly refer clients to us. We are fully insured and maintain a positive rating with the Better Business Bureau. If you do not have the full 15% of the bail amount, we can work with you to arrange payments, with little to no money down. Get the help you need fast with eBAIL.